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and creative and fun programs to educate and nurture the community. she is also active with the full circle fund promoting the next generation of community leaders and driving lasting social change in the bay area. when she isn't running a business or helping her community, she spends time with her two daughters. so, with that i know that supervisor farrell would have loved to have honored you today, julia. thank you for your dedication and service to san francisco. (applause) >> thank you, supervisor tang, president chiu, the board of supervisors, and especially supervisor farrell's office, jeff, jack, margo, and catherine for hosting me today. i just wanted to say this is such an honor. i am in awe of the women first and foremost up here, hopefully one of our future mayors. and i'm in honor of the women who were honored today. i think that, you know, event bright is a place where we're passionate about life experiences. i think it's only natural that we would have been found and had we would build our company in san francisco which is so vibrant and so dense in talent and live experiences
that as the city wide effort to keep our city beautiful. sparkling and clean and educating youth and provide the scholarships and support for them and using culture -- about the cleanliness of our neighborhoods and respecting our neighborhoods all throughout our city. we are also engaging the bright technological mindsen joining us in s f city and join the chambers in creating jobs and training for those last year, last summer, over 5,005,000 and eight jobs were created for summer for our youth, paying jobs every single one of them and this year we expect to exceed it with your help and the help of other companies here and we need to create hope in every aspect for our youth as mayor khan said they are going to inherit the city and the successes that we are pawk talking about today, they are going to also inherit failure and is we want to have less failures with their invest and investment in them and in companies like sales force zooma and at which timer are all leading the evident with the 1800 other technology companies to help us create this investor confidence that companies are leadin
for college credit. the teachers and other educate tors say an online education is not necessarily as effective as one where a student is physically in a classroom. >> everybody thinks that technology is going to solve problems provide inexpensive ways to provide education, we don'tty there is any evidence that it can do this. >> the goal of the bill is to offer 50 basic undergraduate sources that students can take online for uc, cal state for community college credit if the student cannot get into those classes oven campus. supporters say this would help students graduate faster. >> >> bomb sniffing dogs determined there was no bomb it at kimball high school in tracey. students were evacuated and then sent home, marking the first bomb threat at a tracey unified school in the past week. two tracey high school students were arrested after two notes were found in a boy's bathroom at that school. . >> unannounced visit. an infant sleeping in a car seat and another sleeping in a high chair. police have reportedly assigned two detectives to interview parents as they kin their investigat
it done. and that brings me arrest warrant why we're here today. a college track and education. i hear from businesses that they're number one priority is education. they would like nothing better to hire san franciscans but they often struggle to find their candidates. and it's clear to me the only way our city will continue to be strong is if we support the improvement of our city schools. in many cities they choose to address the keegs challenges by picking fights and appointing fingers but once again not in 90 san francisco. together we strive for excellence in our public schools not excused. last year, i met with our community leaders the first time in our memories the mayor and others and we all agree that technology, expediting our kids earlier with the expectation for college and seth them to in our economies is the keys key to success and we're making progress. san francisco unified continues to be the hive urban development are high. we've seen double digit high-grades among our latin and africa kids >> results are being recognized for our achievement we received a federal g
with project safe is to educate the public which i think is our primary goal right now -- that and arrested some of these thieves. these statistics are not necessarily singular events. a lot of these involve backpacks where iphones, ipods, i pads are all part of a robbery. they go steal a backpack off somebody -- i'm gonna show you an example of what happens in those types of cases. most of them are the community being somewhat aware of this iphone. so if i were to hold up $500 and just carry it like this or carry it down the street i don't think anybody would say that's a bright idea buzz that's exactly what you're doing as a victim. you're holding these things out and they're worth anywhere from $200 to $500. include that all your personal photos, your address book and they're out there and people aren't quite aware of it. we've been trying to advertise in the newspapers about the safety of these iphones in particular and we commonly see the victims have 'em out or they're texting. we have an incident where somebody was walking down the street texting and somebody came up and took
an educational background or was taught that in their household. they do not know how to differentiate how to make the right choices. they just know what they have been taught. i am speaking from personal experience. i went to high school and i graduated with a 1.7 gpa. we ran the school, literally. i went to kennedy high school in richmond. it is surrounded by three or four different components. constant shootings -- three or four different hoods. we had to have our varsity football games during school hours. we cannot have it at 7:00 because of the potential danger. there was constant substitute teachers, a lot of bucks. -- lack of books. this is what they are teaching us. not saying that it is a total reason for why it and others turn out the way that we turned out, but it plays a part. just like i have to be held accountable for the choices i make, and so does a society. >> i keep hearing the term gang. in the black community in the bay area, it is a community, it is not a gang. you can move up in their ranks as if you are working for apple or ibm. you can move from a regular employee
. then last week, we met with the director of the early child-care and education of the human services agency and that entity deals with child-care providers from the larger, you know, professional child-care organizations for-profit, non-profit to your child-care providers that work inside their homes. so the primary focus was talking about how could we work together? what way can we work together to assist the smaller child-care providers in running and operating their business? you know, maintaining -- because they are just individuals who do this for love and they don't necessarily think about the business organization. so we have just started having a conversation and a dialogue and i don't know exactly what is going to transpire from here, but just to have the information. we shared with michelle the information that we provide at the assistance center, when an individual or individuals come in, who want to do child-care especially child-care in their home. what are the rules? what are the regs? and also, more importantly, what sort of support is out there? hsa does have some fina
an incredible talent and vision when it comes to educating and training the next generation of young girls to take over the stem industry. that's the science, technology, engineering and math. she is a scientist at one of the leading biotechnology companies. she is the founder of next gene girls. this was started at the grassroots, an organization commit today empowering young women for under represented communities to see themselves in science by introducing the girls to the wonders and the many -- to wonder of the many different scienceses such as engineering, technology and math professions. this is a visionary woman i set before you and it is a privilege to be able to honor her. but a little bit about who she is. she was born in the most beautiful part of san francisco. she was reared in the most wonderful promising talented part of san francisco. and without any further ado, you guys probably guess it had. that's bayview hunters point. you got to give the lady some credit. so, mom and dad, thank you very much for raising outstanding woman. (applause) >> now, ms. jackson, she understan
care reduction. no, no wants to do that. and no one wants to eat our seed corn. investment in education, investment in infrastructure, investment in sign b scientific research in order to keep narrow loopholes open, reductions if you move the business overseas. no, they don't want to debate that. but now we have a budget. because of the leadership of the chair of the budget committee and the members of her committee -- and, by the way, this is no -- this is not a small group of democrats. it runs from our most liberal members to our most conservative members, all united around the budget that is fiscally responsible. it meets the gramm-rudman -- i mean, i'm on old guy -- the simpson-bowles constraints, budget target. it invests in jobs in the economy, and closes loopholes and preserves the middle class' ability to grow and proceed. so, we now are, you know, in this 30-hour thing. we could actually be debating the budget while those 30 hours tick. we don't have to be sitting here doing nothing. and one of our colleagues said, he'd like to debate the budget two weeks from now. why is he p
to work this year with specific and targeted investments, while investing also in education, energy, research and infrastructure and keeping our commitment to america's seniors. our plan is fair, balanced, reasonable and responsible. it is pro-growth, pro-people, pro-america and approach favored by the majority in this country. i yield back the balance of my time. mr. horsford: thank you, congresswoman bass. and to focus on jobs and investing in our future, the fact that is pro-growth, pro-people and 70% of the american people support this type of approach is why the c.b.c. is offering this as an alternative to the house republican majority. and to speak further on the pro-growth needs of this budget, my representative -- my colleague, i should say in the new freshman class. it's been a delight to get to know her, the gentlelady from ohio, representative beatty. mrs. beatty: thank you so much. thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to discuss house budget committee chairman ryan's fiscal year 2014 budget and democratic alternatives that work. i first want to thank my colleague, mr. ho
a western educated technocrat as its prime minister is in exile. after a series of car bomb blasts in iraq, media reports say x month local elections have two provinces in for at least six months. more than 50 people have been killed and 200 have been injured. the attacks coincide with the 10th anniversary of the us-led invasion of iraq. more than one dozen bombs have gone off, many during the morning rush hour. there are bombings at the best of times in other parts of iraqi, but this seems to send a message on the anniversary of the start of the war 10 years ago, the bombing of baghdad started. this morning as people were going to work, the bombings around them, one outside the green zone near the defense ministry. many in more ordinary neighborhoods. thereouth of baghdad, were several explosions, most of them geared at shia neighborhoods, marketplaces, army targets and police. as you can see around me here at the university, life has gone on. over the past 10 years despite the violence. this campus is full of students, some of whom are celebrating their graduation from the law college. w
campaigning for girls rights to an education. taliban extremists shot her in the head. since then, she has been receiving treatment in birmingham. >> at 15, she has already seized responsibility, taking her fight for education to the world stage. there's even talk of a nobel peace prize. concerns today, her are those of every other british teenager. it is all about making friends. she is doing her best. >> she herself wants to be a normal teenage girl and to have the support of other girls around her. i think that is something she has very much missed during her time in hospital. >> she will enter in your 9 -- year 9. >> today, tens of thousands of people filled st. peter's square for the first public mass of pope francis. the newly installed pontiff said out his priorities and thrilled the crowd, riding around in an open vehicle. our correspondent has the story. >> he wants his pontificate to be marked by humility, to be a pope close to the people, so gone are the bullet through screens that would separate him from the masses. he mary's the authority of the papacy with the informal sponta
in san francisco. you know that this city's future don't understand on the education we provide for all our children. it's with great pleurisy introduce the mayor of the city of san francisco. good morning thank you laura republican for that kind introduction and thank you for opening your divorces to me this morning. i want to honor david and all your supervisors and to our two newest supervisors. mayor brown thank you for being here and taking the time to join us this morning. you have done so much in this county >> and since this is my first city address i'm hoping you'll cut me some slack if you chose to write about it in the newspapers. to the department heads and consistent leaders and education leaders to all of you who are online and thank you all of you for joining us this morning. and, of course, to my wonderful wife, mother and friend thank you for being here and pitting up with me for all these years >> a year ago i stood before i and score my term of office pledging to seize the year of the dragon to focus on jobs and to make bold decisions for your future. and to work to
colleagues in the education department in the fine arts museum of san francisco for an allowing me to speak today. valuable artwork -- rene, director of public programs and last on this list but certainly not least gregory stock who is a programming wizard. i'm so grateful for their individual and collective support. i would also like to thank the production manager who is behind-the-scenes somewhere. he's waving. our production manager consistently provide patient and reliable technical support which is beyond value when lecturing to large audiences like those of you gathered today. without further a do, i'm honored to share with you today paintings that comprise the exhibition here at the museum. girl with a pearl earring, from january 26-june 2nd the museum will be the first venue in the american tour of paintings from the royal picture gallery which is located in haik. how many have individual painting in the normal home? a good number of you. this unique museum is often called the jouleewelry box. it has the world's most prestigious paintings from the morris house which toured in 1982
so frequently face discrimination in everyday life. in all aspects of their life. from education, employment and health care, to all of their social relationships. as a result it's harder for them to stay healthy, to get health care insurance coverage, and to get the health care they need. here at cap we are leveraging implementation of the affordable care act help eliminate barriers that keep the and transgender people in the with hiv from achieving the highest animal health care needs, health care that they need. in particular, our lgbt stated change project is working in states across the country to support better data collection, better consumer protection, comprehensive and reliable insurance benefits, and a successful implementation of the medicaid expansion. when you look at the affordable care act, you know, those on the right complained that it is a bit of social engineering. and what it really is is trying to ensure that we cover all americans and provide them with good coverage. we should also look at the aca as an opportunity to expand basic rights for the lesbian, ga
of private housing, employment, education, meaningful relationships, as well as social participation. in addition, we will be working with the centers for medicare and medicaid services to develop, refine, and strengthen policies that promote independent living among all populations, especially those served by medicaid. we would also look with cms to promote home and community-based services and support. last but not least, i will be remiss if i forget to mention that may is also the time of the year when communities across nations come together to celebrate the older americans month. the proud tradition that shows our nation's commitment to recognize is the -- recognizing the contributions and achievements of our seniors. the theme for this year is "never too old to play." we want to encourage older americans to be engaged, active, and involved in your own lives and in your own communities. in closing, thank you so much for inviting me to speak at your summit. we wish everyone the very best, and we want to commend san francisco for again launching this important event today, and tha
to apologize for. first thought wrong properly filtered was some kind of rehabilitation or education or part of the c.o. or the p.d. or the d.a., helps first thought wrong become next right thing. you can do it. i can teach the incarcerated population what to want because they always get what they wanted. they wanted more, they got more. they got it, they got it. they want someday, they left with none. they wanted her or him, they got that. i can tell them what to want now. pass first thought wrong, what to want. they do the right work, i can show them how to keep it this time. my boy's safe all day. it's not because of me. it's because of efforts like this. [applause] >> as our panelists take the stage and get seated, let me introduce our discussion. earlier this year, california state senator mark leno introduced legislation that would revise the penalty for simple drug possession under the state law, making drug possession laws that punish as a felony would now be punished as a misdemeanor. the new legislation, sb-1506, does not apply to anybody involved in selling or manufacturing drugs.
to acknowledge that and bring that into the conversation. and we also try to give back by creating educational and networking eventsed. before i go on, i just wanted to share a few comments. as we began our planning for 2013, we solicited from our email list, some comments both on the attendees' past experience and how it's impacted their business? and kind of the things that they would like to see? a few of those comments when we asked if you attended san francisco small business week in 2012, did your business benefit from attending and if so, how? yes, excellent training, great networking opportunities. great ideas, great information. yes, i attended absolutely my business was improved. i met incredible vendors, mentor and resources to tap as i go, clear, precise and helpful and timely information regarding the business of doing business. and increased self-confidence as i realized i knew more than i gave myself credit for as an entrepreneur. and my favorite one is, "yes, i was not aware there were so many organizations that would help people to start a business." so we feel really good
-- lgbt community. the benefits and what is in play. outreach education and enrollment. you have to inform them of their choices and provide ways to help enroll new coverage where it is available. scaling of the workforce is how we can help with this. how will the care be monitored, and medicaid expansion decisions, health insurance exchanges and ultimately the future of ryan white. i will wrap up now and review of some of these thoughts with what the panel has to say. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, for that thoughtful overview. we are going to move now to our panel discussion. our moderator this morning is the advisor for lgbt policy and racial justice and director of the fire initiative that explores the impact of public policy on gay and transgender people of color. >> good morning, everyone. thank you for providing a great overview for us on how this benefits lgbt people and people living with hiv. includes the principles of universal design. some are marginalized among us and we are helping to work to get a system that works for everyone. we are we're going to talk about what we
getting educated is really critical. this generation has been lost, slip through the cracks, has not been educate along the way. i think an organization like the national endowment for financial education is a great resource to start from. i don't believe that wall street is always the best place to get educated. so there's a start, a place to start a plan. melissa: yeah. >> next thing have someone hold you accountable. meet with somebody. i like pat's idea, find a financial buddy. we often work out with a buddy to help us out. find a financial advisor and somebody you can work with. melissa: that makes sense. you say saving 15 to 20% of your annual income. i wonder at what price? saving aside 20% of the your income, does that mean you don't buy a house, you rent instead? would you set aside the income and use credit cards and rack up debt so you can save? at what price, how serious is it to save that much money. >> how serious is that individual, that's the question. because let's put this in reference. this individual that in our scenario, sob who is 50 to 60 years old or so, they're re
education and with legislative and regulatory agency. we provide formal and informal advice to the city of san francisco and in support of this implementation program, they set up a process where sea members. in this regard we have established a working group to participate in the implementation development of the soft frame retrofit ordinance. this working group of structural engineers have met to discuss the aspects of the ordinance. as part of this discussion the group has developed and endorses the following statements of support for the ordinance. supports the city of county of san francisco's effort to reduce risk through a comprehensive program such as thatten visioned by the safety implementation program and -- can be effective towards risk reduction goals and we'll continue to develop technical criteria appropriate for the ordinances purpose and intent. we will also continue to support the city's implementation of the ordinance through education and guidance of engineers and other stake holders. we look forward to continue our relationship with the county and city of san franc
in the workplace. your reaction? > > my reaction is that these are very privileged women, highly educated, with many opportunities. i do not believe that they are an expression of women today. most people say, in terms of marissa mayer, that, if you want productivity, you let people work from home because they have more time, more energy and more flexibility; and if you want innovation, then you bring them all together. and i think a combination of those two things is the best way to support an institution, a culture, and a business. on the other hand, i am very concerned about it. i think the issue is that women are empowered. we do not- > sandberg you are talking about? > > yes. we do not get our power from men, we do not get our power from others, we do not have to accommodate or manipulate to become empowered. we do have the education, we have the experience, we have the knowledge, and we are empowered. so i believe that i am in opposition to the position of both of those two women. > let me ask you about sexism. there is blatant sexism in countries such as india or afghanistan- > > a
. >>> an american educated i.t >>> 300,000 people have celebrating with the new pope. he says he will lead a humble church that will help the poor. the followers for in the square, and he was elected last week by a secret conclave of cardinals. he then entered st. peter's basilica. he received the ring known as the fisherman's ring. it bears the image of st. peter holding two keys. he called on economic and social leaders to protect the people and the environment. pope francis indicated he will build a closer relationship with followers, raising expectations for reform within the catholic church. >>> an american educated i.t. manager will become the prime minister for the opposition in syria. ghassan hitto lived in the u.s. for decades but now he will govern parts of syria controlled by rebel forces. members of the syrian national coalition met in istanbul, turkey. they voted to elect hitto who moved to turkey last year to help coordinate the opposition. the coalition plans to launch an interim government for northern syria which is under rebel control. 70,000 syrians have died in two years of figh
been working closely with many of our partners year today to educate about these -- many of our partners year today to educate about these issues. also in terms of board guidance. i want to thank all of you for coming. many of you may have assistance. i know many merchants could not be here. please do it share this information with other merchants in the area. we have virginia from the office of small business. we have roger from the bar association. no carla johnson from the office of disability. -- we have carla johnson from the office of disability. i want to especially it acknowledge my colleague to help us get the resources and brought legal expertise to the table. i do not want to take too much of your time. thank you for coming. >> thank you, supervisor chu. i want to express my admiration for a supervisor chu's commitment to you. so, from our office, what we heard, many small businesses were receiving lawsuits regarding it the ada. tonight we will hear about the legal requirements, what has been in place. any small businesses that nderst informed as far as their obligati
for no. 2 and this is the third or fourth year in a row that the quality of public education came out no. 2 and i think when people talk about small business issue, they don't think about that one. no. 3, no surprise, regulations. no. 4, taxation. no. 5, this is another one that i find can kind of interesting. last year it was actually no. 4, but infrastructure. small businesses are concerned about infrastructure, and it's been borne out again by the survey. as far as some of the interesting specifics of the respondents, 48% provide health insurance, 52% did not provide health insurance. interestingly enough and maybe i will talk a little bit more, 74% almost had never heard of the small business tax credit. 63% had never talked to their state senator. their assembly person or to the governor, which i think is a little scary and it's something that hopefully you as a commissioner will re[tpo-rpbs/] that we reinforce to our representatives. those who did need capital 2:1 and those who couldn't get capital versus those who can't get capital. so it's clearly a problem for those who need i
in that process. >> 18 reasons was started almost four years ago as an educational arm of their work. and we would have dinners and a few classes and we understood there what momentum that people wanted this type of engagement and education in a way that allowed for a more in-depth conversation. we grew and now we offer -- i think we had nine, we have a series where adults learned home cooking and we did a teacher training workshop where san francisco unified public school teachers came and learned to use cooking for the core standards. we range all over the place. we really want everyone to feel like they can be included in the conversation. a lot of organizations i think which say we're going to teach cooking or we're going to teach gardening, or we're going to get in the policy side of the food from conversation. we say all of that is connected and we want to provide a place that feels really community oriented where you can be interested in multiple of those things or one of those things and have an entree point to meet people. we want to build community and we're using food as a means to that
programs through her church. [speaker not understood] received her education from oakwood college and california university where she obtained a master's degree in psychology. ms.felder started in the city as a clerk with child crisis and worked her way up to management, to the management level and is now the director of the city's integrated response system. she has demonstrated exemplary leadership, administratively and in the field. she is well loved by her staff as you can tell, and lead her staff by example, working with a team and not above them. she has a hands-on -- she's a hand on manager who doesn't just sit behind her desk, but works closely with her team. and directly with victims and their loved ones. she believes that mental health services need to be brought directly to communities. she is proactive in setting her team to neighborhoods with the greatest need for behavioral health services to engage the community through activities and to build the relationships and trust so that those who may need services and support can be more open to seek the help that they need
in order to get this. we are educated people with means. and resources. it's that difficult for us. the system is broken. not only that, if the high-tech companies really want to fulfill the jobs they have, that they say, however there are, 80,000 that microsoft put out the other day, that in the industry they don't have enough engineers, they are not going to be able to get that bill passed through this congress. thinking pragmatic i. will they won't get it done without a comprehensive piece. what rand paul did today is maybe he disappointed a lot of people in love with him last week. but i think the good thing about him is he has true core beliefs. there is a lot worse that you could have in washington today. >> andrea: i do doubt that the republican party will be able to pull the voters in the party. but from right thing to do perspective, i feel like is it the right thing to do. maybe that's just because of my father's story and i see how hard he worked. i do see that there is dependency issues. i get that with every gender and ethnicity. i get that. everybody is susceptible to
themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with you, doctor. >> i would punt that one right over to david who is the expert in free will, and then we actually spent all last night debating this. david can start. >> ok. >> do you consciously choose to do that? [laughter] >> i think that free will is a mainly unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional
with an education from stanford to develop an innovative, not-for- profit financial incision that uses market principles to affect systemic change. it operates one of the nation's largest individual development, programs, a leading provider of micro loans in california, and has a robust community real estate finance unit. next, we have the ceo of ne community federal credit union. since 1988, she has been the ceo of northwest community federal credit union. under her watch, the credit union group to over 1600 members. it has become the national model for institutions seeking to provide financial education and banking services to the low- income communities. last but not least, we have our conditional lender represented here by wells fargo. mark cyrus is the senior fda banker for the region -- the senior sba banker. he held businesses choose the best loans for the growing business and focus on a comprehensive understanding of their goals for their business. mark is responsible for helping entrepreneurs with sba loans every step of the way. i would like each of you to speak a little bit about w
guarantee and makes investments in education, innovation and infrastructure necessary to job creation and economic growth and protects the middle class from these large tax increases. the democratic alternative reduces the deficit in a fiscal and responsible way and a balanced way. without causing harm today and without threatening our economic competitiveness for the future and reduces the deficit while meeting our commitment to our seniors, our elderly and to our children. i urge my colleagues to reject the republican budget that threatens our seniors, our middle class and our economic growth and to vote for the democratic alternative that builds on our great strength as a nation. innovative entrepreneurial business sector, skilled rs hard-working middle class, vote for the democratic alternative that will builds on hope, security and opportunity for all americans. the chair: the gentlelady's time has expired. the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: the gentlelady from pennsylvania said that ending medicare as we know it. i got news for you, obamacare ends medicare as we know it. it
to the story illustrate a problem with the way people are educated about rain and consent? >> absolutely. i think given the age of the offenders, given the age of the victims, it is so clear that the perpetrators were operating with impuni impunity, that the education about consent needs to begin much earlier, that they believed they were above the law, and that when they were documenting it, they didn't realize that what they were doing is creating evidence in a criminal case. they believed that because the coach had their backs, which suggests that this is a long-standing cultural issue, that absolutely nothing would happen to them. so instead of focusing on the victims' behavior, what we should be focusing on is how do we intervene in this culture that tells boys that they don't have to respect women as humans, and if they sexually humiliate young girls, absolutely nothing will happen to them. if there's anything we can learn, it is the fact that people need to learn from consent is, what stanley impairment is, intervene in a cultural of masculinity. >> speaking about the toxic culture o
online courses for college credit. the teachers and other educate tors say an online education is not necessarily as effective as one where a student is physically in a classroom. >> everybody thinks that technology is going to solve problems provide inexpensive ways to provide education, we don'tty there is any evidence that it can do this. >> the goal of the bill is to offer 50 basic undergraduate sources that students can take online for uc, cal state for community college credit if the student cannot get into those classes oven campus. supporters say this would help students graduate faster. >> >> bomb sniffing dogs determined there was no bomb it at kimball high school in tracey. students were evacuated and then sent home, marking the first bomb threat at a tracey unified school in the past week. two tracey high school students were arrested after two notes were found in a boy's bathroom at that school. . >> unannounced visit. an infant sleeping in a car seat and another sleeping in a high chair. police have reportedly assigned
, in science and research, in education. things that are important to power the economy. our focus has been on jobs first. let's get the economy in full gear. not put the brakes on it. which is what the republicans do. they've gotten austerity budget that according to the nonpartisan congressional budget office, will result in 750,000 fewer jobs bn i end of the year. so we say let's tackle the deficit in a smart way, get people back to work and reduce it over a steady period over a period of time and our comes to balance at the same time that the republicans' budget from last year comes into balance. >> on the issue of revenue, i believe your budget has about $200 billion more in revenue than senator murray's budget in the senate. why did you put that in there considering that republicans are so adverse to any new revenue? >> the budget we have in our democratic proposal. if you take it even together with the revenue from the fiscal cliff agreement, is still less total revenue, luke, than was embedded in the bipartisan simpson-bowles agreement. so we have less revenue proposed by that bipar
think would probably help the city a lot more focusing on education and focusing in terms of economic development. you know, i just have to say -- >> of course his argument is this is critical of a critical public health issue and people who smoke cost millions if not billions of dollars a year. >> but again, sort of return on the time you're going to spend. given the fact that it's not like it is going to stop people from buying vigts. i mean, they can still walk in and purchase them. i just think it is an interesting use of his time and i have to say that i think the city would be better served if he focused on education as opposed to this. >> doug, the head of the new york association of convenience stores is not happy about this. here's what he had to say about it. we think it's patently absurd. can you think of any other retail business licensed to sell legal products that is required to hide them from the view of its customers? he right? >> well, i think that's because the tobacco industry spends about a billion dollars in direct marketing toward -- they make payments to these c
grandson, henry adams, remembered louisa catherine fondly. in his works, the education of the adams, he described louisa catherine and her role in this house and relationship with the family. he felt that she was the odd man out, because she was born in england and educated in france. she remained a foreign personality to many of the adams's. he recollects her sitting in her paneled room, using her silver tea pot that that she brought with her from her home in england to the old house. she would entertain both herself and many guest in this room. john quincy adams and louisa would inherit this home from john adams. i thought about selling it, but then decided that it was important to the family story to hold onto the house for future generations. >> you can visit there today. >> yes. >> wonderful. where the papers? >> they are at the massachusetts historical society in boston. they used to be at the old house would distill my very, but they were transferred to the historical society for safekeeping. >> a question on facebook from genie webber. i have read excerpts from her autobiography
one of innovation, culture - and education. innovation along with it's partner collaboration are being reflected in the explosive growth of the tech sector for each i couldn't engineer hired by pandora or twitter a multiplier effect occurs with job openings create for eliminate oh, mow drivers bare resist at a asks and yoga instructor and is personal finances gore g u r u's and so as we have seen as multimillion dollar facilities being created on both sith of the bay and parts of the rising sports culture tour which we have an abundance of in pot of our cities education is being manifested by the strong and growing influence of our public and private universities in tandem with our expanding healthcare sector. in oakland in 2013, oakland will have three major projects under way for over $2.2 billion surpassing san franciscotion current healthcare construction. we will get this keep it moving here ... it's a little the technology that we are talking about ... there we go. okay. office space previously used by the shining fire sector is now being converted into more efficient and ope
of the mayor's visions for the city and is after 12 years of educating professionals in the greater san francisco bay area and around the world we at g g u firmly believe that an educated workforce is the best way to bring that vision forward. we applaud mayor khan's efforts to workforce development opportunity opportunities for the cities and we hope to work with her to create additional opportunity we thank the mayor for her continued services in the city of oakland and the bay area now before you meet her there is going to be a short video but we want you to welcome may khan. thank you. >>> oakland has a rich hair damage it's talented and there is a few reason why artistss are gravi at a timing to oakland one it has a long history of art for many reasons certainly there is a huge rich tradition here it's a perfect artistic hub it's a place that if i were back in a band i would seriously consider located locketting my place here you can grow your audience there is a lot of new businesses sprod sprouting you mean and new cafe and is stews. and if i brought someone to oakland the
. in the courtroom, i believe that to help judges, judges when we do the education, one of my collaborators who does this work teaches them how the brain changes with addiction, et cetera, et cetera. that may be helpful for judges sentencing to drug courts for addiction problem instead of prison for a long period of time. the primary problem is one of addiction and treatment of remediation of that and the subsequent behavioral problems and other things is probably far more cost-effective and good for that person than simply sentencing them to prison time. and so i think the neuroscience helps to educate and change our ways that we understand drugs and drug addiction. >> another question is have you ever been allowed to testify regarding i.q. in a hearing or a trial using your program? >> yes, i just did that this weekend. so i testified this morning. i do know that -- so the atkins case was actually argued by a professor at the university of new mexico and he is constantly barraged by what's the best way to assess i.q., especially when you have these different tests and different measures, et cetera
to provide them with an opportunity to correct their behavior and move on so they can get education and get employment and they can become a productive member of society. and generally the juveniles, again, that we deal with are not any different than the adults we deal with. these are juveniles that often come from homes where supervision of the home is either not there or is very lacking. there's really a significant lack of role model support so there are a lot of problems already. the juveniles that generally come to our attention already bring with themselves. the problem is there's still not enough funding, there is not enough vehicles to provide the services that are necessary, so that is a challenge for us, and unfortunately, often the drug use, drug abuse and those other things do lead to serious crimes when they in fact do become involved in a different part of the process. the other question has to do with back and track. i don't see 1506 impacting negatively on back on track. in fact, the conversations in our office are today around how do we expand the program and back on track
and opportunity. we want families that are strong, children that are well educated. we want to lift people up from poverty, to put the american dream in reached for everybody. our party cannot hire our way forward. it must inspire our way forward. we will do a better job of connecting with people to our principles, showing how we can help every american climbed the economic ladder. knowing parents want the best for their children we will champion school choice and solutions to lowering the cost of health care. instead of arithmetic our focus should be on what helps families thrive. we don't want to fix the debt because a balanced budget looks nice, we want to do it because it will keep money in people's pockets and create more jobs for those who have lost hope. the report minces no words in telling us that we have to be more inclusive. i agree. our 80 percent friend is not our 20 percent enemy. we can be true to our principles without being disrespectful of those who don't agree with a hundred percent of them. finding common ground with voters will be a top priority. so first, we're going to learn
? and for many, will my schools perform to the ability that my kids can get a great education? it's one of the thing that is' important to be relevant. you see, a couple years ago before i was governor there was a young woman named miss sampson in wisconsin in a community called milwaukee where the milwaukee public schools are some of the most challenged in the country. and this young woman was a first-year teacher who was named the outstanding teacher of the year. she got notice about that, and about a week, week and a half later she got a second notice. do you think what that was? she'd been laid off. you see, under my predecessor, they cut funding for education, but they didn't give them anything in return to make up for them, so what happened? when you have less money in those situations even though she was named one of the best teachers in the state in her profession, what happened to her? she was one of the first to be laid off. why? because under the old system of collective bargaining, one of the last hired is the first fired. one of the great things you may not know about in ou
of it -- >> on the delivery end. >> hal: right. maybe their decision-making procession will be slightly more educated? >> yeah, i think there are a couple of things. i think hagel got nominated at least in part because a lot of the job of the secretary of defense going forward is going to be caring for the people who fought the two wars and having somebody who served the way he did is a good idea. and kerry was the obvious choice once the other thing blew up. >> hal: even before. but i also think it points to -- because he was always a good idea for it even with or without susan rice. he apparently wanted it it was not a -- obviously i think one of the reasons that republicans were so happy with it because they felt they could get an open seat to shoe horn scott brown back in. but here he is picking people for big cabinet positions that are uniquely qualified for the first time. >> yeah, and i think -- you know -- i mean i don't want get entirely sidetracked on this not on a day when mark sanford is back on the ballot -- >> hal: yeah. against stephen colbert's sister. >> no. >
. >> solman: a blogger for the chronicle of higher education, potter has argued that older scholars are clogging the pipeline for the younger ones. the number of ph.d's now far outstrips the number of tenured job openings. >> there's a lot of rage out there about being trained for jobs that you can never have. is it worth keeping younger people out, not giving them the chance to have full-time work, to develop themselves, so that older people can hang on to keep everything we love? >> solman: and these days, even younger people aren't always spring chickens. it's been seven years since 38- year-old joe fruscione earned his ph.d in english from george washington university. he has yet to land a full-time job. >> the market for ph.d's in humanities is almost super- saturated. there have been some positions where i've had to compete with hundreds of applicants who all on paper have roughly the same education and skill sets. >> so fruscione works three part-time gigs. one is running a moby dick discussion group at a washington, d.c. bookstore. >> when you hear moby dick, you think... >>
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